COLOSSAL & THE LOVERS: Lies in Advertising

The respective relationships between the misleading trailers and actual movies for Nacho Vigalondo’s painfully perplexing Colossal and Azazel Jacobs’s fascinatingly perplexing The Lovers exemplify two types of flicks that spawn false advertising, both for the same predictable reason: commercial appeal.

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WAR DOGS (Todd Phillips): Perverting the American Dream

At a time when a former (some would say current) entertainer has become the official Presidential face of one of the most powerful countries in the world, a movie – that most classic of American entertainment – from last year now feels like a harbinger of Donald Trump’s America. Though the script was written well before the batshit craziness otherwise known as the election of 2016, Todd Phillips’ War Dogs offers up perverse depictions of not only Trumpian figures but also the paradoxical aspects of American culture – specifically the mythological tradition of the American Dream – that have allowed for such megalomaniacs of excess to attain success in this country.  

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A Weekend in the Cinema: GOING IN STYLE

One of a critic’s imperative responsibilities is to retain some form of objectivity in their analyses. Subjective taste will of course always partially influence opinion, but those tasked with critiquing for the benefit of the general public should strive to value that which can be justified—or at the very least explained—to others in their proclaimed judgements.

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Why – in 300 Words – THE AUTOPSY OF JANE DOE, LIGHTS OUT, and Many Other Horror Flicks Should’ve Just…Come to Broadway?! (or Off, or Off-Off, or Off-Off-Off, etc. ad infinitum)

Add last year’s The Autopsy of Jane Doe and Lights Out to the long list of excessively derivative, and thus increasingly tired horror movies that would be better suited for the stage.

Continue reading “Why – in 300 Words – THE AUTOPSY OF JANE DOE, LIGHTS OUT, and Many Other Horror Flicks Should’ve Just…Come to Broadway?! (or Off, or Off-Off, or Off-Off-Off, etc. ad infinitum)”

A Weekend in the Cinema: KONG: SKULL ISLAND (and more on LOGAN)

Kong: Skull Island shares traits with both of the last two weekends’ slates of releases: like Get Out two weeks ago, it’s basically the sole offering of interest this weekend; and like last weekend – but unlike Get Out, unfortunately – this lone offering did not offer moviegoers much of a reason to leave their houses to hit the local cinema.

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A Weekend in the Cinema: LOGAN; TABLE 19; BEFORE I FALL; THE SHACK (kinda)

All three (or I guess four) of March 3rd’s wide releases suffer from flawed screenplays failing to transcend the more artistically restrictive conventions of their chosen genres. Logan is the biggest and also probably the best, less a testament to its (disappointing) quality and more a reflection of the overwhelming turpitude of these offerings…

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Movie Roundup 3/3-22 (Tweet-of-Consciousness)

THIS WEEK’S LINEUP
Dying Laughing (Lloyd Stanton / Paul Toogood) / The Last Laugh (Ferne Pearlstein)
Catfight (Onur Turkel) / Fist Fight (Richie Keen)
The Girl with All the Gifts (Colm McCarthy)
I Am Michael (Justin Kelly)
The Last Word (Mark Pellington)
My Scientology Movie (John Dower)
Song to Song (Terrence Malick)
Wolves (Bart Freundlich)

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